Keeping data and systems safe, accessible and fully backed-up.

Here at Serviceteam IT the team have written a lot about the Internet of Things (IoT). It seems to be everywhere. However, now there are an increasing number of reports which warn technology companies, governments and the insurance sector about cyber-security threats from the IoT. We all need to take an interest in how we can make sure this emerging technology of connected devices is safe to use.

Entrepreneurs trying to grow their businesses are juggling so many demands on their time that they may find themselves unwittingly leaving the back door open to cybercriminals.

Cyber-security incidents are at large, and everybody knows it. Data breaches are now a daily occurrence and threaten both businesses and individuals. But just how many people do these incidents affect, where do the hackers come from, and what should I look out for to prevent a cyber-security attack on my device?

Israel has accused Hamas – a Palestinian Islamist group – of using a World Cup live scores and fixtures app and two fake dating apps to hack soldier’s smartphones and spying on them. Who can be safe from cyber-criminals and hacking?

Dog collars to toasters are connected as part of the Internet of Things (IoT), with experts predicting that by 2020 more than 50% of new businesses will run on the IoT. However, cyber security and privacy are the biggest challenges for IoT, collecting large amounts of personal identifiable information. As soon as some financial benefit from hacking smart devices appears, cyber criminals will find a way to take advantage of it.

Many have labelled the rise of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a new type of industrial revolution. AI has the potential to improve productivity across a range of sectors, whilst lowering costs. However, there are risks of AI, similar to any technology that is not adequately managed or secured. The criminal network has been improving this capability for years through the use of botnets, and AI brings with it a new range of cyber security risks.

An energy revolution is on the horizon, in which both utilities and consumers will produce and sell electricity. Blockchain technology is already being tested in a number of different places. For example in New York State it is being tested as a way of selling solar energy between neighbours and in Germany one power company is running a pilot to see if blockchain technology can authenticate and manage the billing process for autonomous electric-vehicle charging stations.